1862: Henry Klice to Family

These letters were written by Henry Klice (1844-1922) who enlisted as a private at Prattsburg to serve three years in Co. E, 101st New York Volunteers in December 1861. He was wounded in action at the Second Battle of Bull Run on 30 August 1862 and was discharged for disability (chronic diarrhea) in April 1863 at Convalescent Camp, Alexandria, Virginia.

Henry’s parents were William Klice (1796-1880) and Eliza Albro (1806-1882) of Prattsburg, Steuben county, New York.

aacivklice8
Patriotic Letterhead on Henry’s 20 March 1862 Letter

TRANSCRIPTION LETTER ONE

Washington [D. C.]
March 20th 186[2]

Dear father and mother,

I now take this opportunity to write you a few lines to let you know that I am well and I hope when this reaches you, that it will find you enjoying the same blessing.

We have moved from where we first encamped and have gone about three miles and encamped on a hill where I can see twenty or thirty thousand of troops encamped. We expect marching orders everyday to march south or go on an expedition, I don’t know which. We got our equipments the other day.

The Thayer boys are encamped about a half a mile from here. I have seen them three or four times. They are all well and enjoying good health and feel as happy as kings. One of them is corporal and the [other] private.

Mother, Herman is well and sends his love to all that want it. Mother, do you know where William’s address is? If you do, I wish you would write and let me know if you will. Write as soon as you can. So goodbye.

Your loving son, — Henry Klice

Fred, how are you getting along? Are you going to school or are you a feeding the pig or the chickens or what are you doing?

Washington D. C., 101 Reg. Co. E, N. Y. S. V., Care of Col. [Enrico] Fardella


aacivklice93
Patriotic Letterhead on Henry’s Letter of 2 May 1862

TRANSCRIPTION LETTER TWO

Camp Cameron
Washington D. C.
May the 2nd 1862

My dear brother Fred,

I thought I would take this opportunity in writing you a few lines to let you know that I am in good health and I hope that when this reaches you it will find you enjoying the same blessing.

It rained here last night and is so muddy that we cannot drill today. We have pleasant weather about half the time and the other half it rains and is muddy. Fred, it looks some like spring here. The trees is leafing out and the Cherry trees is in bloom and grass in the meadow if from four to six inches deep. It is pleasant here when it don’t rain.

Fred, we have to go on guard every ten days. There is ten companies in a regiment and one company goes on each day. They have three shifts and stand on post two hours and off four so that makes eight hours out of twenty-four. We have to drill about six hours a day so it keeps us pretty busy.

Fred, we was paid off the other day and I sent fifteen dollars home by Express. Have they received it yet? Fred, how is ma? Is she a getting better? I got a letter from Emma the other day and she said that she was a getting well. I was glad to hear it I tell you. Fred, what are you a doing this spring? What is pa a doing? Is he a patching shingle? I wish you would write and tell me all about it. And what is Sherman Ribinson a doing? Is he to home or not? Give my respects to him and tell him to write and I will answer it.

I do not know what else to write so I must close. Give my love to father and mother and all that ask about me. So goodbye from your loving brother & obedient servant, — Henry Klice

P. S. You never saw a Confederate Note so I thought I would send you five dollars note for a curiosity. It is a fair sample of the rebel’s money.


TRANSCRIPTION LETTER THREE

Washington [D. C.]
May 2nd 1862

Dear Mother,

You need not think I have forgot you for I have not. Ma, I am well at present and I hope and pray that you are the same. I received a letter from Emma the other day and I was glad to hear from her. She said that you was a feeling better. I talked of coming up there. I was glad to hear that you had got so that you could get around.

Ma, we have not left the old camp yet and I do not think that we will until we leave for home. I hope not at any rate. But a soldier does not know one night where he will be the next.

Ma, have you got the money I sent or not? If you have not, you will find it in the Express Office at Bath. Write as soon as you get it. I can’t think of no more to write—only you must write to me as soften as you can and have Fred write. You can tell him what to write. Edwin Thayer writes to Mister and I should think that I was as good as he is. At any rate, I will try and be so good. Bye for the present.

From your loving son, — Henry Klice


TRANSCRIPTION LETTER FOUR

Camp Cameron
Washington D. C.
May the 10th 1862

Dear father and mother,

I now take this opportunity in writing you a few lines to let you know that I am not dead yet. I am well and in good health and I hope that you are the same. As I was a writing to William, I thought I would write a few lines to you as I feel just like it.

Mother, we have been down to the creek to wash our clothes today and the sun shines hot enough to dry one article while we are a washing the other so that when we get done washing, our clothes will be very near dry. We have lots of fun a hugging and kissing the peddlers—both black and white. We can get most any[thing] to eat if we have lots of money.

We have not got across the [Potomac] river yet and I do not think we will very soon. Some think that we will be discharged before many months. I hope so at any rate for I have got tired a having so many bosses. I should like to be my own boss once more. I like to be a soldier first rate if they were not so many bosses to look out for but I hope that I will not have to stay here long.

Mother, it [is] very warm here. The trees is all leafed out and it looks beautiful indeed. But enough of this. So I must close. Write as soon as you get this. So goodbye.

From your loving son, — Henry Klice

Co. E, 101 Regiment New York State Volunteers, Washington D. C.

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